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Armenian dress

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Title: Armenian dress  
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Subject: Culture of Armenia, Armenian cuisine, Armenian art, Armenian literature, Ethnic minorities in Armenia
Collection: Armenian Clothing
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Armenian dress

Part of a series on
Armenians
Armenian culture
Architecture · Art
Cuisine · Dance · Dress
Literature · Music  · History
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Armenia Portal

The dress of the Armenians reflects a rich cultural tradition. Wool and fur were utilized by the Armenians and later cotton that was grown in the fertile valleys. Silk imported from China was used by royalty, during the Urartian period. Later the Armenians cultivated silkworms and produced their own silk.

The collection of Armenian women’s costumes begins during the Urartu time period, wherein dresses were designed with creamy white silk, embroidered with gold thread. The costume was a replica of a medallion unearthed by archaeologists at Toprak Kale near Lake Van, which some 3,000 years ago was the site of the capital of the Kingdom of Urartu.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ The Costumes of "Armenian Women” and “ARMENIA Crossroads of Culture- by Anahid V. Ordjanian
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