World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Haryana Police

Article Id: WHEBN0031725104
Reproduction Date:

Title: Haryana Police  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Government of Haryana, Law enforcement in India, Haryana, Sandeep Singh, Sardara Singh
Collection: 1966 Establishments in India, Government of Haryana, State Law Enforcement Agencies of India
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Haryana Police

The Haryana Police department is the law enforcement agency for the state of Haryana, India.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Organizational Structure 2
    • Horizontal Units of Haryana Police 2.1
    • Geographical Units of Haryana Police 2.2
      • Police Ranges 2.2.1
      • Commissionerate 2.2.2
  • References 3

History

The Haryana Police were formed when the state of Haryana was established after bifurcation from the state of Haryana was established, the organisation had the responsibility for enforcement of the law in 6 district and had a strength of 12,165 personnel.

Organizational Structure

Haryana Police comes under direct control of Department of Home Affairs, Government of Haryana. The Haryana Police is headed by Director General of Police (DGP).[2]

State Police Headquarters located in Sector 6, Panchkula. The total headcount of the personnel working in Haryana Police at present is 56,747.[3]

Horizontal Units of Haryana Police

For efficient organization, Haryana Police is structured into several horizontal unit that serve across the state across all Police Ranges (rural and mixed areas) and Police Commissionerates (large Urban-only areas):


Crime Investigation Department (CID)

CID is investigation and intelligence wing of the Haryana Police headed by a Director General of Police (DGP)-CID.

Haryana Police Raj Bhavan Branch

This unit is headed by an Additional Superintendent of Police (ASP) who acts as Aide-de-camp (ADC) to current Governors of Haryana.

Haryana State Crime Branch

State Crime Branch is responsible for investigating serious and organized crimes, is headed by the Director General of Police (DGP)-Crime.

Haryana Police, Telecommunications Branch

It is responsible for telecommunications and wireless infrastructure of police, is headed by the Inspector General of Police (IGP)-Telecomm.

Haryana Police, Railways & Technical Services (RTS)

It is responsible for policing of railways infrastructure and commuters, is headed by the Inspector General of Police (IGP)-RTS.

State Crime Record Bureau (SCRB)

It is responsible for maintaining crime records, is headed by the Director-SCRB.

Haryana Police Academy (HPA)

It is responsible for training the police, is headed by the Director-HPA.

Haryana Armed Police (HAP)

It supplies the head count for the police, is headed by aAdditional Director General of Police (ADGP)-HAP. Haryana Armed Police (HAP) has five Battalions each headed by a Commandant: 1st Battalion - Ambala, 2nd Battalion - Kernal, 3rd Battalion - Hisar, 4th Battalion - Kernal and 5th Battalion - Kernal.

Haryana Police, Traffic & Highways (TH)

It is responsible for policing roads and highways, is headed by the Additional Inspector General of Police (AIG)-TH.

Haryana Police - Police Training Centre (PTC), Sunaria, Rohtak

It is headed by aInspector General of Police (IGP)-PTC, Sunaria.

Haryana Police, India Reserve Battalion (IRB), Bhondsi

It is headed by the Additional Director General of Police (ADGP)-IRB.

Geographical Units of Haryana Police

For better law enforcement and administration, the Haryana Police has divided the state into 4 Police Ranges (rural and mixed areas) and 3 Police Commissionerates (highly urban areas).[4]

Each Police Range is further divided into Police divisions. A Police division is equivalent to a division is a Police District. Haryana state is divided into a number of districts. Each district is headed by a Superintendent of Police.

Each Police Division or district is sub-divided into Police Circle, each commanded by a Deputy Superintendent of Police. In the case of a district including large cities, two separate police districts are created, known as the City Police District, headed by a Commissioner, and the Rural District Police, headed by a Superintendent. Typically, a police district in the state corresponds with the administrative district. Though, the head of the Police force in the district is the Senior Superintendent of Police who is always an officer of the Indian Police Service, the ultimate/final responsibility with regard to the maintenance of the law and order in the district lies with the District Magistrate who is an officer of the Indian Administrative Service.

A Police Circle is usually headed by an officer of the rank of Deputy Superintendent of Police. The officer heading the Police Circle/Sub-Division is designated as the Circle Officer (C.O.). A Police Circle is usually constituted by 2 to 4 Police Stations.

Each Police Station is headed by a Police Inspector. Throughout the state, there is a main Police Station in the older/main part of the city known as the Kotwali or Sadar. The Kotwali or Sadar covers the main or usually the older part of the town/city under its jurisdiction. Earlier, when the cities and towns were smaller and had lesser population than at present and they hadn't gown in size so much, the Kotwali covered the main town area of the cities or the districts. A police station is also called as a Thana in the local language. The officer in charge of a Police Station is designated as or called as the Station Officer (S.O.) or Station House Officer (S.H.O). He is assisted by various Sub-Inspectors, Assistant Sub-Inspectors, Head-Constables, Constables. There are also a number of Police Chowkis that come under the Police Station.

A Police Chowki (Permanent Neighborhood Police Post) is under the charge of a Sub-Inspector of Police or an Assistant Sub-Inspector of Police. They bulk of normal beat policing and patrolling. Each Police Chowki is divided into areas called beats regularly patrolled by lower rank police personnel e.g. constables.

Police Ranges

There are a total of 4 Police ranges (rural and mixed areas) in the state of Haryana. Each range is headed by an officer of the rank of Deputy Inspector General of Police. Each Police range is constituted by around 2 to 4 districts. The following are the Police ranges in Haryana.

Hisar Range

This range has the following Police Divisions each corresponding to a district: Hisar district, Fatehabad district, Sirsa district, Jind district and Bhiwani district.

Karnal Range

This range has the following Police Divisions each corresponding to a district: Karnal district, Yamunanagar district, Kurukshetra district and Kaithal district.

Rohtak Range

This range has the following Police Divisions each corresponding to a district: Rohtak district, Jhajjar district, Sonipat district and Panipat district.

South Range

This range has the following Police Divisions each corresponding to a district: Rewari district, Palwal district, Mahendergarh district and Mewat district.

Commissionerate

A police commissionerate is a law enforcement body especially in the urban parts of the state. The commissionerate is headed by a Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) (equivalent to ASP). There are 3 commissionerates under Haryana Police:

Ambala-Panchkula Commissionerate
Gurgaon Commissionerate
Faridabad Commissionerate

References

  1. ^ http://haryanapolice.nic.in/police_act.pdf
  2. ^ Organisation
  3. ^ History of haryana police
  4. ^ History of haryana police
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.